Category Archives: Poetry

Win a copy of THE LAST JAZZ FAN AND OTHER POEMS (KINDLE edition)

See this #AmazonGiveaway for a chance to win: The Last Jazz Fan: And Other Poems (Kindle Edition).

https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/20b732e00162dfde NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Ends the earlier of Aug 7, 2018 11:59 PM PDT, or when all prizes are claimed.

See Official Rules http://amzn.to/GArules.

 

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The Last Jazz Fan and Other Poems by Kenneth Salzmann now available

The Last Jazz Fan and Other Poems, a collection of recent and selected poems by Kenneth Salzmann, is now available from Amazon.com and other major online booksellers.

The book has drawn praise from such literary notables as the iconic poet-novelist-activist Marge Piercy, who said, “Salzmann is a rare poet who can draft excellent and moving poems about nature and politics, about love and place, about old age, spirituality and friendship.

“You can feel in the poems the intelligence of the mind that created them and the compassion and wit of the poet.”

Novelist and short story writer Lucia Nevai, a recipient of the Iowa Award for Short Fiction and the author of Seriously (Little Brown) and Salvation (Tin House), said of The Last Jazz Fan and Other Poems, “Here is a mind unfairly comfortable with paradox, be it intellectual, emotional or spiritual — and a heart-breaking voice that is up to the task.”

The Last Jazz Fan and Other Poems contains 31 poems and retails for $10.95.

The Last Jazz Fan

for David Peirce

The last Jazz fan slipped

from the world one night

like the amorphous

notes of a trumpet solo

at closing time. Some say

reedy melodies hovered

above him like nimbus clouds

at the exact moment rhythm

left the room. Explosive riffs

be-bopped across the sky

when the last jazz fan

returned to stardust,

and clarinets cooled

the darkness. Some say

it is the silent spaces between

that describe the song,

but some say the spaces

might expand until

they swallow the song

and silence is certain.

 

 

“The Last Jazz Fan” was first published in Chronogram. Copyright 2017/2018 Kenneth Salzmann

https://www.amazon.com/Last-Jazz-Fan-Other-Poems/dp/1985201194/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1526131400&sr=8-3&keywords=kenneth+salzmann

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The Last Jazz Fan

 

david

for David Peirce

The last jazz fan slipped

from the world one night

like the amorphous

notes of a trumpet solo

at closing time. Some say

reedy melodies hovered

above him like nimbus clouds

at the exact moment rhythm

left the room. Explosive riffs

be-bopped across the sky

when the last jazz fan

returned to stardust,

and clarinets cooled

the darkness. Some say

it is the silent spaces between

that describe the song,

but some say the spaces

might expand until

they swallow the song

and silence is certain.

 

http://www.chronogram.com/hudsonvalley/poem-the-last-jazz-dan/Content?mode=print&oid=2550516

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“On the Day of the Dead”

I’m pleased to have my poem “On the Day of the Dead” included in the new issue of Antiphon in both text and audio.

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The (S)catbird

It just didn’t seem fair, the way those experts dissed the catbird on a public radio program I happened upon.

I assume they were correct in saying he’s only a mimic, but isn’t it the case in song that interpreters can matter every bit as much as originators, and quite often surpass the composer in mining the music? How else would you explain, say, Ella Fitzgerald?

So, here’s what I had to say to those opinionated birders, in a poem now appearing in the Winter 2016 issue of WestWard Quarterly (print only).

catbird

The (S)catbird

Those believed to best know birdsong say

and say again the catbird lacks a song of its own

to broadcast from the crest of a winterberry tree.

 

In some way the critics know nature’s error of orchestration

that leaves this bird only to sample the proper sounds

of the wood thrush the magnolia warbler the red-eyed vireo

even the spring peeper, even your neighbor’s lawnmower.

 

In some way they know that the catbird’s mews

and whistles and squeaks, nasal moans and throaty

gurgles, count only as illegitimate borrowings from

the walls of sound that delimit his woodland home.

 

But we lack such certainties and, for the gift of lacking,

we still can make with innocent wonder the critical mistake

of marveling at the catbird’s discredited scatted inventions.

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Why not every poem is a sex poem

Okay, here’s the story. Early last summer, I was one of 12 participants in noted novelist/poet/activist Marge Piercy’s annual juried poetry intensive. On a day when we were charged with writing a poem using a single extended metaphor, about half of the people in the workshop showed up with freshly-minted sex poems. Sex lends itself to metaphor, after all. I wasn’t a part of that half, but I couldn’t help but write this for the next session. Then my filmmaker friend Ronn Kilby decided to work on it as well . . .

 

Why not every poem is a sex poem

Some poems are theological, in a biblical sense.

Some are heroic tales of gland-to-gland combat.

Some political poems turn on a joint session of congress.

 

A poem can be about completing the jigsaw puzzle,

crashing the custard truck, making a magical sandwich,

sharpening a pencil, parallel parking, or exploring a mine shaft.

 

A poem can be about checking the oil, churning the butter,

Driving Miss Daisy, filling the gas tank, hitting a home run,

jumping the turnstile, planting a parsnip, or disappointing the wife.

 

You’ll discover many poems about putting bread in the oven,

plowing through the bean field, passing the gravy, whitewashing

the picket fence, peeling the tree bark, or taking Grandma to Applebee’s.

 

So why did you think sex has to be the thrust of every poem?

 

 

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Touch: The Journal of Healing

I’m happy to have a poem of mine  — “After the Diagnosis” — included in the new issue of Touch: The Journal of Healing, along with some compelling work by Elise Hempel, David Anthony Sam, Dianne Silvestri, and others.

 

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